Bean of the Week – Garbanzos

I think part of the reason I fell in love with cooking is that it’s not nearly as hard as it seems.  While I love trying new things, I’ve found that many of the things that sound complicated are actually pretty easy.  But, if you buy the finished product you get charged A LOT for it.  One of my favorite cheap eats is beans.   I used to stock up on canned beans for quick meals, and unless I got a really good sale, it was not cheap and the selection was mediocre at best.  Thanks to the dried beans, I’ve tried beans that I didn’t even know existed like Peruvian Beans/Yellow Canary beans.  I’ve found beans that I have never seen in a can like Mung beans.  I even found Adzuki beans at Whole Foods which apparently are really high in protein (and BTW: the bean paste that is used in many Asian pastries) and gave them to the kid who LOVED them.  Now, I buy dried beans for quite a savings in comparison and less need for storage space.  I gave up on the canned beans when I realized that even though the cost is pretty similar for a can of beans and a pound of dried beans, the resulting amount is VERY different.  A 1-pound pack of dried beans makes up to 6 cups of beans.  The canned beans only give you a little less than 2 cups of beans.  If you get the dried beans, you can infuse them with flavor.  Canned beans… not as much.  Depending on the dried beans you buy, they can cost less than $1.00 a pound and bulk buying can be even better priced.  And carrying tons of cans out of a supermarket will test even the best of reusable bags.

It’s surprisingly easy to make beans from a dried state and it requires very little actual cooking time.  Garbanzo beans take the most time of all of the beans I’ve tried so far, but it’s still not actual standing over the stove time so it’s still worth it.  Once I realized how easy this was, I haven’t gone back.

BTW: If you’re looking for cheap garden seed, you can use some of the dried beans to grow in your garden.  It’s worth a try and if it doesn’t work, you don’t lose a lot of money for the effort.

Part 1: Soaking

  • Get a big glass measuring cup/bowl that can hold at least two quarts.  If you bought the 1 pound pack of beans, just dump the whole bag into the cup/bowl.  If you bought in bulk, put the bowl on a kitchen scale and measure out 1 pound.  You can spread the beans out on a sheet pan to look for stones or you can just look through them in the bowl.
  • Fill up the bowl with water and put the bowl in a corner of the kitchen.  (Go do anything else.)
  • Check the beans after about 4-8 hours (Small beans like mung beans soak faster than large beans).  I leave garbanzos for 12 hours or more if i’m busy (I’ve left them up to a day and they turn out fine).
  • If the beans have soaked up the water and look plump, pour out the beans into a sieve and rinse the beans.  Do a double check for any dark or funky looking beans or anything that isn’t a bean.  (If a bean doesn’t look good, toss it)

Part 2: Cooking

  • Get a pot big enough to boil pasta.  Toss in the beans.  Fill it up with water.  (DO NOT ADD SALT!!!) Now, add the flavorings of your choice.  I like to add a bay leaf, a garlic clove, a quarter or a half of a yellow onion, half of a large carrot, half of a celery stalk, and whole peppercorns.  You can add any fresh herbs you want here.  Savory & Thyme are generally my favorites.  [If you want to use dried herbs or don’t want to fish the peppercorns out when you’re done, I recommend getting one of the large tea balls made with tiny mesh and putting your herbs in there and wrapping it around the pot handle or hanging it on the side of the pot.] (See, your beans are already going to taste better than canned beans)
  • When I’m doing this in small batches for the kid, I don’t add a lot of flavorings.  At most, I’ll add half of a carrot, but I’m working him up to adding everything else slowly.  For now, I’m just letting him taste all the different beans on their own.  And most importantly, I cook the beans much softer for the kid than I do for the adults.  This way the beans crack open and are easily smashed so he doesn’t choke on them, even though he has top and bottom teeth that he likes trying out on various foods.
  • Turn the heat on a back burner up to high to bring the pot up to a boil.  There will be some white foam on the top of the water.  Skim it off and turn the heat down to medium to let the beans simmer.  This can take about an hour depending on the bean.  Set a timer to go back and check it at regular intervals after 30 minutes.  If you’re doing garbanzos, save the effort and start checking after an hour.  They take a long time to cook through.  Test a few beans to see if they’re soft enough.  If they’re not soft enough and the water has fallen below the beans, add more water and let it keep cooking.  When they’re done, turn off the burner and let the beans cool down in the water.

Part 3: Packaging

  • For The Kid: I haven’t given the kid garbanzos yet.  I stick to the softer, smushable beans.  I fill up his food containers with the beans and add enough of the water the beans cooked in to cover the beans.  I rinse the beans to remove the cooking water before giving the beans to the kid.  I rinse them off before I send them to daycare so they don’t have to.  He likes to eat the beans as finger food.  For the larger beans, I smush them a little so their soft, but he can still grab them.  It’s hilarious to watch him gobble them up.
  • For the Adults: Grab a container or containers, fill it up with the beans, add enough of the water the beans cooked in to cover the beans.  I add a pinch of salt for the sake of preservation.  Toss it in the fridge.  After about a day in the fridge, I rinse the beans in a sieve and they’re fine to store in the fridge without the water.

I rinse off the water I store the beans in before I cook with them or toss them in salads just like I would if they were canned, but storing them in water just seems to work better.  I keep the beans in the fridge for about a week or two.  If I don’t end up using them in the Meatless Monday dinner, then I just use them to toss in salads.  I try to do a different bean each time.  When I do garbanzo beans and it’s getting close to the end of the week or second week, I just roast them.  I just adjust the recipe according to how many beans I actually have left and eat the roasted garbanzo beans as snack food or for tossing in salads for crunch.

 

Roasted Garbanzo Beans

1 cup Garbanzo Beans
1 Tablespoon Flavoring of choice (dried herbs, ground spices, crushed red pepper flakes)
1 Tablespoons Olive Oil (or garlic oil)
salt to taste

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.  Toss the garbanzo beans, oil and your flavoring of choice in a bowl.   Toss everything around until the garbanzo beans are coated with the oil and flavorings and spread out on a sheet pan.  Every 15 minutes or so, shake the pan to help the beans brown evenly.  Roast for about 45 minutes or until the beans are crunchy and brown (not burnt).

BTW: This works great in a toaster oven.  If I’m doing it in the toaster oven, I turn down the heat to 325 degrees.

 

Comments
  • Debra says:

    Sorry momma but you lost me here… I vowed to NEVER eat beans again as a child and unless I have a kid who could benefit from the nutrition I am sticking to it. Silly I know but a promise is a promise LOL.

    • Monique says:

      I understand… Everyone has their own line in the sand. lol. If you don’t mind me asking, what happened to make you break ties with the entire bean population?

  • Debra says:

    As a child you may say I could be irrational I am still a little stubborn at times but then I would just accept whatever consequence that came my way to be able to do what I wanted or not wanted in this case. My grandmother was the type of parent who made me sit at the dinner table until my food was done and after falling asleep and feeding it to the dog (i literally traded with my dog b4) and wrapping them in napkins and throwing them away spoonful at a time did not get the message across I literally just swore Beans off entirely. No more trying to eat some to please, no more hiding and sneaking I am not eating beans PERIOD. No lima, pinto,black, red, kidney, pork n bean, nothing with the name bean even associated. Eventually it became public information that you were wasting your time trying to feed me any form of beans and so it goes 2011 I have not ate a bean for at least 20 years. Now I eat string beans and I have even prepared a black eye pea or too but over time i think it just was my nature to refuse any product associated with beans.

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